Review: Of Poseidon by Anna Banks

Of Poseidon
Author: Anna Banks
Publisher: Feiwell & Friends
Age Group: Teen
Source: Purchased from Amazon
Amazon     Barnes and Noble     IndieBound
Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Summary from GoodReads:

Galen, a Syrena prince, searches land for a girl he’s heard can communicate with fish. It’s while Emma is on vacation at the beach that she meets Galen. Although their connection is immediate and powerful, Galen’s not fully convinced that Emma’s the one he’s been looking for. That is, until a deadly encounter with a shark proves  that Emma and her Gift may be the only thing that can save his kingdom. He needs her help–no matter what the risk.

My Thoughts:

I think I might have  had my expectations too high for this book.   I was left a bit disappointed when I had finished the story.  I’m not saying I didn’t like this book, or that I don’t recommend it, but I didn’t like it like I was expecting to.  Let’s talk about the things I liked, first.

I loved the whole idea of the Syrena.  The idea of a whole society of merfolk (but don’t let them hear you call them that!) at the bottom of the ocean is fascinating.  I grew up watching The Little Mermaid, so I really think merfolk are fascinating.

I also liked the main characters, Emma and Galen.  This book is sort of told in alternating points-of-view.  One chapter will be from Emma’s point-of-view, and then the next will follow Galen (although these chapters are non 1st person POV).  But this allows the reader to know where Galen and Emma are coming from in their reactions.

I really did get a kick out of Rayna and Toraf (although there was something that bothered me a lot about their relationship – see spoilers below if you are interested).

I did find it a bit predictable, but that doesn’t always bother me.  I usually find the “how they got there” more interesting than trying to figure out what is going to happen.  But all the same, I did think it was pretty easy to figure out somethings early on, and I kept wondering why Galen and Emma didn’t realize it.

I was also expecting this book to be very funny.  I read a character interview on a blog (I can’t remember which one, now) with Galen and Toraf and it was really funny.  Although this book has funny parts, it wasn’t as humorous as I thought it would be.   This might not bother a lot of people.  I just love humor in my stories, so I was sad that the writing wasn’t as humorous as I was expecting.  I did get a kick out of the Syrena not knowing about certain parts of human life.

So I am big on not having spoilers in my reviews, but I really want to discuss some aspects of this book.  That’s why I started a book blog, so that I could discuss the books I’ve read.  Below are some of the things that bothered me about the book.  They definitely are spoilers, so don’t read them if you don’t want to know too much about Of Poseidon.  They are in white font, so highlight them to see the words.

SPOILERS

Some things in the plot didn’t make a whole bunch of sense.  For example, we’re told that every third generation, the eldest Royal children from the Poseidon kingdom and the Triton kingdom mate so that the Gerenals’ gifts will be passed to further generations.  Okay . . . so Galen is all worried about Emma having to mate with his older brother Grom.  Okay . . . but if they are so worried about passing the genes down, why can’t Galen mate with Emma.  I mean, he’s from Triton’s camp, Emma is Of Poseidon, so, if they have children, the genes get passed down.  I’m not following the logic.  Plus, Galen never seems to take into account Emma’s wishes.  I can’t imagine her saying, “sure, I love you Galen, but I will marry your brother Grom.”   I don’t think so.

Also, Emma’s whole theory that her Syrena abilities starting because she bumped her head when she ran into a door seemed ridiculous.  So she had a concussion.  Big deal!  That is supposed to trigger her Syrena abilities?  Again, I just couldn’t believe it, and I don’t know why Emma and Galen believed this so easily.

Some other things made me a bit uncomfortable, too.  The whole Rayna and Toraf being mated (pretty much married) without her permission, or her even being there.  Eww!  I don’t care if this is the custom of the Syrena society.  That is wrong!  And the fact that it could happen all the time in Syrena world.  I think the Syrena world needs some women’s rights activists!  Espeically, how Rayna ends up accepting Toraf.  I am not saying I didn’t like them as a couple, because I did.  I could see why they would make a great couple.  But I hated that part.  Plus, being mated at 18.  Especially in this day and age, I couldn’t stop getting freaked out about it, even if it is the custom of the Syrena.

END SPOILERS

Overall, I am glad that I read this book, but my expectations were probably too high.  It ends with a major cliffhanger, which is really frustrating!  I think I am getting a bit burned out with cliffhanger endings, and maybe even series in general.

If you’ve read this one, please let me know what you thought about it in the comments below.

You can read a short story written by Anna Banks about Grom and Nalia here.  This is a prequel to Of Poseidon.

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About Quinn

I'm a twenty-something children's librarian at a public library in Central New York. I've long left my teen years behind me, but I love to read YA and children's books. I have two adorable dogs. Ginger is a mix between a poodle and havanese, and Daphne is Bichon Frise. Other things I love: Favorite Movie: Singing in the Rain Favorite Book: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Favorite TV Show: Monk
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1 Response to Review: Of Poseidon by Anna Banks

  1. Merin says:

    You and I basically had some of the same issues with this book! I was definitely disappointed with it, although I’m willing to give the second one a shot just to see if things get better. If you’re interested, my review is here.

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